Hackers can take control of smashed Android phones using replacement screens

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Hackers can take control of smashed Android phones using replacement screens.
Researchers at the University of the Negev have shown that replacement screens for Android smartphones can be manipulated to steal personal information and take control of a repaired device.
The attack, which is almost undetectable, can be used to “severely compromise” a victims’ smartphone, the researchers said.
It works through a malicious chip that is embedded within the replacement display.
They were able to record what was typed on the affected devices, such as passwords, download apps onto it, and send users to malicious websites.
The researchers could order the compromised device to take a photo of the user and forward it to hackers in an email.
With a small amount of additional work they were also able to use the manipulated screen to access the operating system of the affected devices.
They said the hack could work on an iPhone as well, but did not demonstrate this.
The researchers urged smartphone manufacturers to create a physical defence system that would prevent such a hack from being possible.
Australia’s consumer watchdog sued Apple earlier this year over claims it purposefully stopped devices working after cracked screens were replaced by third parties.

Data Breach

Hackers can take control of smashed Android phones using replacement screens

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Hackers can take control of smashed Android phones using replacement screens.
Researchers at the University of the Negev have shown that replacement screens for Android smartphones can be manipulated to steal personal information and take control of a repaired device.
The attack, which is almost undetectable, can be used to “severely compromise” a victims’ smartphone, the researchers said.
It works through a malicious chip that is embedded within the replacement display.
They were able to record what was typed on the affected devices, such as passwords, download apps onto it, and send users to malicious websites.
The researchers could order the compromised device to take a photo of the user and forward it to hackers in an email.
With a small amount of additional work they were also able to use the manipulated screen to access the operating system of the affected devices.
They said the hack could work on an iPhone as well, but did not demonstrate this.
The researchers urged smartphone manufacturers to create a physical defence system that would prevent such a hack from being possible.
Australia’s consumer watchdog sued Apple earlier this year over claims it purposefully stopped devices working after cracked screens were replaced by third parties.

PlayStation social media accounts briefly hacked

PlayStation social media accounts briefly hacked

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PlayStation social media accounts briefly hacked.
Sony became the latest entertainment company to suffer at the fingertips of hackers after their PlayStation social media channels were temporarily hacked on Sunday evening.
A group called OurMine claimed credit for the compromise that targeted the company’s Facebook and Twitter accounts.
Sony quickly regained control of the accounts but not before the hackers had posted a series of messages on the social media accounts.
OurMine is a well-known Saudi Arabian security hacker group that have previously hacked other celebrity accounts.
However, they claim to be an ethical hacking group and are only interested in helping the groups that they hack with claims that they only want to “show you all available vulnerabilities, and fix them all!” The hacking group have labelled themselves as an “elite hacker group known for many hacks showing vulnerabilities in major systems,” on their website, along with a list of services/promises that they promote.
A hack on PlayStation is nothing new having previously suffered at the hands of hackers in 2011 when the PlayStation Network was attacked leaving millions of PS3 users unable to access the network for 23 days.
Xbox, the gaming industry’s other leader, has also suffered from the unwanted intrusion of hackers back in 2014 when its Xbox Support account was taken over for 45 minutes by the Syrian Electronic Army.
While the intentions behind the hack seem to be very much based on the promotion of the hacking group, it must be a major concern for both Sony and PlayStation alike, that private user information, including credit card details, may have been compromised.
Sony have yet to make an official statement regarding the hack but you would imagine it is only a matter of time before they address the issue.

Credit Card Fraud

Six Effective Ways To Keep Your Money Safe While Traveling

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Pickpockets that often target crowded tourist areas are an added risk to your finances on vacation, so always make sure to plan wisely and take all the necessary precautions when traveling.
Use your credit rather than your debit card.
If your wallet gets stolen, debit cards offer less protection, and dealing with fraudulent charges is less of a hassle on your credit card.
However, if you need to withdraw cash, use your debit card; credit cards have high fees.
– Stacy Francis, Francis Financial, Inc. 2.
For example, you can carry a money pouch under your clothing, with one credit card and a small amount of cash.
Keep a separate credit card and ID hidden in a locking suitcase at your hotel.
Only Use Bank ATMs A major source of money theft comes from where you’d least expect it: the ATM.
Only Use Credit Cards Whenever I travel, I follow a simple rule: no cash, no debit.
Exchange enough money at the airport to get you to your hotel with some to spare.

Online Credit Card Fraud Risk Increases Due to Russian Online Carding Course

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Online Credit Card Fraud Risk Increases Due to Russian Online Carding Course.
Credit card fraud has always been a problem for digital payments.
It has become increasingly easy for criminals to obtain credit card information, either by keylogging user information or by hacking online retailers.
It now appears Russian hackers have put together a compendium of sorts which allows anyone to abuse stolen credit card information with relative ease.
Credit card fraud has always been a big problem.
The number of credit cards stolen from online retailers or through other cyber attacks has risen almost every single year.
When security researchers stumbled across a six-week online course teaching Russian hackers how to card goods and services using stolen credit card information, things took a turn for the worse.
Credit cards are an integral part of eBay and PayPal, making them prone targets to carding attempts.
This WWH course is on par with regular university courses, as it oozes professionalism and the intent to share knowledge.
The “teachers” claim they will continue to update course materials on a regular basis.

Digital Shadows study explores tactics of credit card fraud gangs

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Digital Shadows study explores tactics of credit card fraud gangs.
Digital risk management firm Digital Shadows recently released the findings of study that explored the various habits and tactics utilised by credit card fraud gangs.
The company’s global team of analysts evaluated a wide range of criminal forums and discovered a rising trend of remote learning ‘schools’.
Typically taught in the Russian language, these schools offer six-week courses that are so sophisticated, they include webinars, course materials and detailed notes.
Cyber criminals who complete these courses could potential make up to $12,000 a month.
Rick Holland, VP Strategy at Digital Shadows, commented: “The card companies have developed sophisticated anti-fraud measures and high quality training like this can be seen as a reaction to this.” “Unfortunately, it’s a sign that criminals continually seek to lower barriers to entry, which then put more criminals into the ecosystem and cost card brands, retailers and consumers.
However, the benefit is that the criminals are increasingly exposing their methods, which means that credit card companies, merchants and customers can learn from them and adjust their defences accordingly.”
Other insights from the study show that social engineering techniques are heavily emphasised in the courses as it is the main weapon used by cyber criminals to discover PIN codes, and personal details of the cardholder. “This ecosystem is highly complex and international.

Why Are Millennials Avoiding Credit Cards?

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Why Are Millennials Avoiding Credit Cards?.
That compares to only 45% of Americans between the ages of 30 and 49, and 38% of those aged 50-64 without credit cards.
The 2009 Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure (CARD) Act probably played some part in the decrease by making credit cards difficult to obtain for those under age 21.
Unemployment may be keeping some millennials from qualifying for credit, but others appear to be avoiding credit cards as a matter of principle.
Debt/Interest Rate – Credit card debt is usually the highest interest rate debt you will incur and if you charge more than you can pay off each month, debt can spiral to unmanageable levels.
Ease of Overspending – The flipside of the convenience advantages listed above.
Poor Credit Scores – Just as you can build your credit history with responsible credit card use, you can damage it with irresponsible use.
Having no credit history makes it difficult to qualify for loans and mortgages, but having a poor credit history increases those difficulties.
The most responsible path is to use cards sparingly, pay them off in full each month, and stay at a small fraction of your credit limit (10% or less if possible).
Avoiding credit cards is advisable if you cannot use them responsibly.