Information Security – Data Breach

One cybercrime in every 10 minutes in first six months of 2017: report

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One cybercrime in every 10 minutes in first six months of 2017: report.
New Delhi: The rate of cybercrime has increased in 2017, as one case of cybercrime was reported in every 10 minutes in the first six months, said a report in The Economic Times.
According to Indian Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT-In), 27,482 cases of cybercrime were reported from January to June.
This is higher than 2016 when a cybercrime was reported in every 12 minutes, added the report.
Analysis of data from 2013 – 2016 shows that network scanning and probing, which is seen as the first step to detect vulnerabilities in systems so that sensitive data can be stolen, constituted 6.7% of all cases while virus or malware attack accounted for 17.2%, added the report.
The cybercrime includes global ransomware attacks that hit hundreds of systems, to phishing and scanning rackets.
The report said while India has been dealing with crimes such as phishing and defacement, ransomware attacks have come as a surprise.
Other crimes in the cyberspace include phishing, scanning or probing, site intrusions, defacements, virus or malicious code, ransomware and denial-of-service attacks.
India has seen a total of 1.71 lakh cases of cybercrime in the past three-and-a-half years and the CERT claims that the number is likely to cross 50,000 by December.
The RBI has also been issuing regular warnings on bitcoins, added the report.

Scotland witnessing ‘significant’ growth in cyber crime

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“Another big problem has always been the lack of reporting.
Under-reporting is a difficulty facing all forces, so we don’t know what cyber is costing us.” The Scottish Government and Police Scotland say they are working on systems to classify cyber crimes – but unlike the rest of the UK, there are no dedicated cyber crime statistics, leading for calls for them to be compiled.
A Johnston Press Investigation showed police forces in England and Wales saw an 87 per cent rise in cyber crime investigated in the past year alone – with around 85 per cent going unsolved.
The JP Investigations Unit sent Freedom of Information requests to every police force in the UK.
Data showed that 39,339 cyber crimes were reported to 30 police forces in England and Wales in the last 12 months, up from 21,037 the year before.
Offences under both acts were deemed by the Scottish Government to be the only ones identifiable as cyber crime.
However, cyber-enabled crimes such as fraud, malicious communication, or the sale of illegal items are all covered by legislation that doesn’t separate online from non-online offences.
Police Scotland said it was unable to provide information on how many cyber crimes it had investigated in the past three financial years.
Paddy Tomkins, chairman of the Scottish Business Resilience Centre said: “The Scottish Government and Police Scotland are working very hard on classifying these crime figures, but it’s fair to say that what’s going on nationally will be proportionately happening in Scotland.
“Cyber crime is a threat that has come about really very quickly and it changes on a daily basis, so we need to be able to keep up with that we can also adapt and change.” A Scottish Government spokesman said: “The Scottish Government is live to the threat of cyber crime, which is growing at an unprecedented rate.

Antivirus for Android Has a Long, Long Way To Go

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Taking on the mindset of an attacker, the researchers built a tool called AVPass that works to smuggle malware into a system without being detected by antivirus.
“Antivirus for the mobile platform is really just starting for some companies—a lot of the antivirus for Android may even be their first iteration,” says Max Wolotsky, a PhD student at Georgia Tech who worked on the research.
So in creating AVPass, the researchers started by developing methods for defeating defensive algorithms they could access (like those created for academic research or other open-source projects) and then used these strategies as the basis for working out attacks against proprietary consumer antivirus—products where you can’t see the code powering them.
Free Pass To test the 58 Android antivirus products and figure out what bypasses would work against each of them, the researchers used a service called VirusTotal, which attempts to identify links and malware samples by scanning them through a system that incorporates dozens of tools, and offering results about what each tool found.
By querying VirusTotal with different malware components and seeing which tools flagged which samples, the researchers were able to form a picture of the type of detection features each antivirus has.
Before this reconnaissance, the team developed a feature for AVPass called Imitation Mode, which shields the test samples submitted for antivirus scanning so the snippets themselves wouldn’t be identified and blacklisted.
The team worked with mainstream malware samples from malware libraries like VirusShare.com and DREBIN. “They are just rogue apps in most cases, so they are far easier to detect.”
And Mannan notes that though Android antivirus apps have a lot of leeway in the system, they aren’t as privileged as antivirus apps on PCs, which could potentially cut down on concerns that antivirus can sometimes be exploited as a security vulnerability in itself.
The AVPass team says that Android antivirus developers need to build out their products so the programs are looking for multiple malicious attributes at once.

Data breach of Australia’s Medicare exposed, EHR safety concerns raised

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Investigating the breach and publishing a statement to notify the Privacy Commissioner of the breach and patients, especially if patients are affected, are the steps that the Australian Government would want private health service providers to take.
Since the government has announced a new opt-out online health record in the 2017 Budget, a deeper look into security concerns will also be pushed to maintain the public trust and confidence in the security of online health data.
According to the Australian Government, it is the healthcare providers’ responsibility to protect personal data from attacks by cyber criminals.
Patients’ health information was being sold on a popular auction site and Alan Tudge, the human services minister, has admitted that his department was not aware of this data breach.
The investigation by Guardian Australia revealed all the shocking details in its paper, including the fact that at least 75 patients’ personal details have been sold and that one of its reporters purchased his own Medicare number at AUD $30.
Government agencies are highlighting approaches that can help all healthcare providers to know when there’s a serious data breach.
The Department of Human Services sees this data breach as a traditional criminal activity instead of a hack or a cyber-attack.
Medical officers are concerned on the safety of EHR Doctors are concerned now at how this breach can make patients turn away from the Australian Government’s digital medical file scheme, a AUD 1 billion My Health Record System that is set to be implemented for all residents of Australia in 2018.
Questions are being asked and answers are being demanded from the Government by the Australian Medical Association on this issue specifically on how patient confidentiality should be protected.
“But to do all that both doctors and patients needs absolute confidence in the integrity of personal information.” Speaking on this, a Health Department spokesman said that the Government’s digital medical file scheme has multiple layers of security to protect access to the system and that so far, there have been no security breaches of patient data in the system.

Largest dark web market closed in massive government takedown

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The Department of Justice and Europol announced Thursday that they have shut down AlphaBay and Hansa, two massive marketplaces on the dark web that served hundreds of thousands of customers trying to get their hands on illegal goods online.
While you or I can easily buy groceries, electronics and clothes online, when it comes to finding drugs, weapons and stolen identities, things can get a little more complicated.
Merchants of contraband hide out on the dark web, a hidden part of the internet that you can only access through special browsers like Tor.
AlphaBay alone had 200,000 customers and more than 40,000 sellers peddling illegal goods, making it the largest takedown for a dark web marketplace ever.
The website had 100,000 listings for sale when the governments took it down.
In comparison, Silk Road, one of the most notorious dark web markets, had 14,000 listings when the FBI shut down the site four years ago.
Hansa was the third largest dark web market when it shut down.
The website made $1 billion in sales before it was shut down in a joint operation of the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Agency, Dutch police and Europol.
Terbium Labs had been following the dark web for months, specifically in marketplaces like AlphaBay.
After AlphaBay’s shutdown, its users flocked to Hansa, increasing the dark market’s traffic in eightfold, Wainwright said.

Most Guns Sold on the Dark Web Originate From the United States, Study Finds, Surprising No One

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Most Guns Sold on the Dark Web Originate From the United States, Study Finds, Surprising No One.
Roughly three-fifths of the weapons sold on a selection of dark web marketplaces originate from the United States, according to a new study examining the scope of the internet’s black market arms trade.
The first of its kind, a report from RAND Corporation details the ever-expanding role of the dark web in facilitating the sale of firearms, ammunition, and explosives.
“While the use of these platforms as facilitators for illicit drug trade has increasingly been the subject of research by a number of academics, little has been done to conduct a systematic investigation of the role of the dark web in relation to the illegal arms trade, drawing on the insights offered by primary data,” the report says.
Of the 811 listings, 41 percent were for firearms; 27 percent were for arms-related digital products; and 22 percent were for ammunition.
The ‘ship from’ country on other listings by the same vendor.
The ‘ship from’ country of a vendor on other cryptomarkets.
The data shows that up to 59.9 percent of the firearms sold across the 12 examined cryptomarkets originate from the US—the world’s largest exporter of conventional weapons.
“The dark web is both an enabler for the trade of illegal weapons already on the black market and a potential source of diversion for weapons legally owned,” said Giacomo Persi Paoli, a research leader at RAND Europe and the report’s lead author.
A few people using illegally purchased weapons from the dark web can have severe consequences.”

Here’s how the US can retaliate against Russian hacking and ‘kick them in the balls’

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Here’s how the US can retaliate against Russian hacking and ‘kick them in the balls’.
But attributing and responding to cyber crimes can be difficult, as it can take “months, if not years” before even discovering the attack according Ken Geers, a cybersecurity expert for Comodo with experience in the NSA.
Even after finding and attributing an attack, experts may disagree over how best to deter Russia from conducting more attacks.
But should President Donald Trump “make that call” that Russia is to blame and must be retaliated against, Geers told Business Insider an out-of-the-box idea for how to retaliate.
Thomson Reuters The move would be attractive because it is “asymmetric,” meaning that Russia could not retaliate in turn, according to Geers.
In the US, the government does not control communications, and Americans are already free to say whatever they want about the government. “What if we flooded the Russian market with unbreakable encryption tools for free downloads?,” Geers continued.
It would put the question back to them, ‘what are you going to do about it?'”
The NSA would study the challenges Russia has with censorship, how it polices and monitor communications, and then develop a “fool-proof” tool with user manuals in Russian and drop it into the Russian market with free downloads as a “big surprise,” he added.
The ball would be in Russia’s court, so to speak, and they might think twice about hacking the US election next time.

News Wrap: U.S. and Russia discussing cybersecurity collaboration, says Russian news agency

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JUDY WOODRUFF: In the day’s other news: Russia’s official RIA news agency reported the U.S. and Russia are talking about creating a cyber-security working group.
President Trump had raised a similar idea during the G20 summit, but backed off under heavy criticism.
The Congressional Budget Office says that a revised Senate Republican health care bill leaves as many people uninsured as a previous version.
The CBO reported today that, under the bill, another 22 million Americans would lose coverage by 2026.
The health of Senator John McCain dominated this day at the U.S. Capitol.
The disease has killed 35 million people over the past four decades.
Today, in a live-streamed hearing, Simpson, now 70 years old, pleaded his case to the state parole board.
SIMPSON: I have done my time.
JUDY WOODRUFF: Simpson’s defenders said that his 33-year sentence was overly harsh, and that he was really being punished for the murders of his ex-wife and her friend in 1994.
ExxonMobil was fined $2 million today for violating U.S. sanctions on Russia in 2014.

Students get schooled in cybersecurity

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Students get schooled in cybersecurity.
But for 40 local high school students, the second annual GenCyber Jersey Blues program is about playing mind games.
Brookdale Community College hosted the cybersecurity camp for students who have an interest in protecting the nation, individuals and companies against computer-related attacks, on the college’s Lincroft campus.
I want to work for the government, protecting against hackers and all that,” says Josh Gates, a senior from Raritan High School.
“So, I found this camp online and I thought it would be a great experience.” At the camp, students learn about password protections and how to defend against hackers.
Even at a young age, some have been exposed to the dark side of the internet.
So that just interested me in how vulnerable everything is on the internet,” says Julia Hollosi, a junior from Westfield.
Interest in cybersecurity has received a boost from the news about Russian hacking and recent spy movies, including “The Imitation Game,” which is about cracking German codes in World War II.
“The ‘Caesar code’ is a wheel and it has all the letters and then it has an out wheel so if you have a letter ‘a’ you can turn it so ‘a’ equals ‘q,’” Livingstone explains.
They also played games solving puzzles — tools used in the recruitment of future code-breakers.