Employment

Data Breach at UC Health and Healthcare’s Ongoing Struggle

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In Cincinnati, Ohio (USA), the Daniel Drake Center for Post-Acute Care of the UC Health system has reported unauthorized access to patient medical records for the past two years by an employee.
They also have not disclosed how they identified the recent breach.
Additionally, the Daniel Drake Center will be providing training to all employees about cyber security.
Healthcare Security Challenges General consensus among security experts is that the healthcare sector is the most unprepared for protecting data.
This has been the case year after year.
Part of the unique security challenge within healthcare is the fact that healthcare organizations must share patient data.
Another challenge for the healthcare sector is that cyber security is not a priority for the healthcare industry.
UBA is the activity of tracking, collecting, and analysis of log data.
It is important to have security integrated into the daily processes of work for employees.
If they’re able to identify vulnerabilities then they can be tasked with patching them up.

The Key to Cybersecurity? Level Up on Resistance

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(TNS) — The first step in protecting a business from cybersecurity attacks is educating employees because nearly all breaches result from a worker clicking on a phishing email or an inappropriate website, Information Technology experts said Thursday.
Ninety to 95 percent of it is through employees,” said David DeArmond, owner of Strix Louisiana, a business productivity and IT services firm.
Brandon Reeves, CEO of EtherMon LLC, an IT cybersecurity services firm, was the other.
Businesses can protect themselves by securing their networks with some sort of firewall, monitoring information flowing into and out of the network; installing anti-virus software on computers and smartphones; and backing up data.
DeArmond said the typical system backs up data every 30 minutes, so if there is a ransomware attack — malicious software that blocks a user’s access to data until a payment is made — a business loses very little of its data.
Bad guys are looking for the path of least resistance.
However, small businesses as a group are a huge target, DeArmond said.
They don’t have controls in place or spend much on security, so they don’t offer much in the way of resistance.
An EtherMon employee posed as a FedEx worker delivering a package to a hospital senior executive.
Google is helping people with “free” services, but Google gets the right to users’ data.

A Ghost Story – The Haunting Presence Of An Ex-Employee

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What happens when someone leaves the company?
Shockingly, the latest research from OneLogin shows that despite the threat of former employees, more than half (58 per cent) still have access to the corporate network once they have left an organisation and almost a quarter of businesses (24 per cent) experience data breaches due to the action of ex-employees.
The OFCOM data breach could have been catastrophic if it had have been used by a competitor, not to mention the potential damage to brand reputation.
In fact, Marriott Hotels experienced the full force of a disgruntled former employee in 2016.
HR & IT must collaborate and take accountability A former employees’ word is not enough.
Automated processes can be used to deprovision all access to corporate accounts within minutes of an employee’s contract being terminated to protect valuable corporate data.
Companies need to use the right tools to ensure this happens.
Most applications don’t yet have an automated deprovisioning API and require manual intervention from IT.
Application access events sent to SIEM systems, to double-check that no ex-employees are accessing applications.
Alvaro Hoyos, CISO at OneLogin Security Articles access alvaro hoyos automated deprovisioning businesses corporate corporate access corporate data data data breach directories such employee employees employees leaving ensure this happens ex-employees former former employee former employees have left ideal world

Companies Warned Of Cyber Security Dangers Caused By Employees Working While On Holiday

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Companies Warned Of Cyber Security Dangers Caused By Employees Working While On Holiday.
T-Systems (http://www.t-systems.co.uk), the corporate IT and cyber-security arm of Deutsche Telekom (Europe’s largest telecoms company), is warning organisations of the security risks associated with allowing employees to work while on their summer holiday.
Our research found that despite the pace at which cyber-attacks are evolving, 66% of respondents had received no up-to-date education within the past twelve months.
Nearly 30% of respondents say they have never had cyber security education at any employer.
10% use free USB charging points at airports and stations.
These ports can be used to transfer viruses and malware to unsuspecting users The blame, however, cannot solely be placed on the employees, remarkably 28% of employees have never in their working career had any cyber security trainingto protect themselves and their employer, as you can see the threats are avoidable Cyber-security training for all employees is particularly important as the dangers continue when employees come home from holiday.
T-Systems’ research found that: 18%of employees admit to connecting their digital camera to their work computer to download photos.
15% admit to connectingUSB sticks and memory cards that they share with their family members to their work computer.
About T-Systems: T-Systems company profile T-Systems research – the key facts: T-Systems research – the key facts: Table 1 – Poor cyber security practice is common: I use my personal phone and / or PC / laptop for my work email 31.60% I email work documents to my personal email address 27.90% I use free Wi-Fi hot spots (in cafes, stations, etc) when using my personal phone and / or laptop for work (e.g. email, documents, etc) 23.80% I use my personal PC / laptop for work productivity (e.g. Word, PowerPoint etc) 22.90% I use free Wi-Fi hot spots (in cafes, stations, etc) when using my office phone / tablet / laptop for work (e.g. email, documents, etc) 15% I use USB charging points at airports / stations for my work laptop, tablet and / or phone 9.80% I use the same passwords at work as at home 6.80% I do at least one of the above 66.40% Table 2 – Which of the following do you connect to the Desktop/ laptop computer that you use for work (whether you are in the office, your home, or elsewhere)?
In the past 6 months, please specify in months 8.40% In the past 7-12months 25.40% In the past 13-24 months 9.70% Over 2 years ago 7.80% So long ago I can’t remember when 5.70% Never at my current employer (but had some at a previous employer) 3.70% Never at any employer 28.40% N/A I don’t use a Desktop, laptop or smartphone for work 11.00% Study & Research T-Systems / laptop for work cards also known as usb free wi-fi hot spots hot spots in cafes hot spots in cafes stations known as usb sticks laptop for work e.g email personal phone and / research the key facts spots in cafes stations spots in cafes stations etc sticks and cards also known t-systems research the key facts usb charging points at airports use free wi-fi use free wi-fi hot use free wi-fi hot spots wi-fi hot spots in cafes work e.g email documents work e.g email documents etc

Data breach exposes Killeen school district employees online

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Data breach exposes Killeen school district employees online.
The personal identification of teachers and employees of the Killeen Independent School District were exposed on the internet.
Names and Social Security numbers were at some point visible online, according to a June 23 letter sent by James Crow, executive director of the Texas Association of School Boards, recently notifying district employees, as well as other school districts, of the data breach.
The letter said the board immediately began an investigation with the help of a leading computer forensics firm, and took action to secure a computer program and employee information.
The board is offering a free one-year membership of credit monitoring and identity theft protection through Experian.
The letter states the board is taking steps to prevent a data breach from happening again, including a comprehensive review of data security measures currently in place.
The association is a voluntary, nonprofit educational organization whose mission includes providing information to Texas school board members to better serve their communities.

Google Employees Data Stolen After Data Breach

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Google Employees Data Stolen After Data Breach.
Google has informed its employees that their personal data including names, credit card and contact details have been stolen after hackers broke into a travel agency software working with Google.
In a letter, Google informed the affected employees about the breach and explained that their drivers’ license, passport, and Social Security Numbers (SSN) were not stolen.
The agency which came under cyber attack is Sabre, a Southlake City, Texas-based popular travel technology firm.
Sabre explained to its customers that Sabre Hospitality Solutions SynXis, a reservation system used by more than 32,000 hotels around the world were targeted by unknown attackers.
CWT subsequently notified Google about the issue on June 16, 2017, and we have been working with CWT and Sabre to confirm which Google travelers were affected.” Furthermore, the letter informed that: “Sabre’s investigation discovered no evidence that information such as Social Security, passport, and driver’s license numbers were accessed.
However, because the SynXis CRS deletes reservation details 60 days after the hotel stay, we are not able to confirm the specific information associated with every affected reservation.” Google has urged its employees to “remain vigilant” and keep an eye on any suspicious activity as hackers can use the stolen data to carry out identity fraud.
In such cases, Google employees are advised to contact Federal Trade Commission (FTC) or law enforcement authorities.
Also, Google is offering 24 months of complimentary identity protection and credit monitoring services.
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Data of Google Employees Exposed in Sabre Breach

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Data of Google Employees Exposed in Sabre Breach.
Carlson Wagonlit Travel (CWT), one of the companies Google uses to make hotel arrangements for its employees for work-related travels, has informed the tech giant of the breach.
Google employee data exposed via Sabre platform However, the actual breach didn’t take place at CWT either, but Sabre Hospitality Solutions, a company that develops SynXis Central Reservation System, a platform used by tens of thousands of hotels across the globe to allow travel agencies like CWT to make hotel reservations.
It was infosec reporter Brian Krebs who spotted the breach in Sabre’s SEC filings at the start of May.
As Sabre notified travel agencies of the SynXis breach, the agencies then notified their own customers, with CWT alerting Google of the incident.
According to the letter, Google is sending employees, the hacker who breached Sabre’s systems was able to collect data such as contact details and payment card.
Because the Sabre systems delete reservation details after 60 days, Google wasn’t able to determine what data the hacker accessed for each employee during that interval.
Google has offered to provide two years of free identity protection and credit monitoring services for all affected employees.
Many other users might be affected as well The incident is considered a small breach for Google, but anyone who traveled during the above interval should check with their travel agency and see if the Sabre breach might have exposed their personal or payment card details.
Data Breach Google

The New Rules of Identity Theft Protection for Employees

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The New Rules of Identity Theft Protection for Employees.
And the child continues showing up on her pharmacy records as a dependent.
“To this day, I don’t know if my name is in the baby’s medical record,” she notes.
Her insurance information had been stolen and used by someone else to obtain medical care.
But medical identity theft also poses a serious risk to employee health.
Medical identity theft is thus, above all, a quality-of-care issue.
While medical identity fraud is the fastest growing type of identity crime, identity theft generally continues its march unabated.
The number of US data breaches recorded in 2016 set an all time high of 1,093—a 40 percent increase from 2015, notes an authoritative Data Breach Report by ITRC.
For an employer to fully protect its employees, health insurance information will require the same attention and care that financial institutions have offered to their credit card customers.
For more information about how to help your employees protect themselves from identity theft, don’t miss Kevin’s session, How the Growing Threat from Medical Identity Fraud Puts Your Employees & Company At Risk—And What You Can Do About It only at the 9th Annual Employer Healthcare & Benefits Congress, October 2 – 4 in Los Angeles.

Insider Threats Are More Risky Than You Think

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What is an Insider Threat?
According to US-Cert.gov, an Insider Threat is a current or former employee, contractor, or other business partner who has or had authorized access to an organization’s network, system, or data and intentionally misused that access to negatively affect the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of the organization’s information or information systems.
How is an Insider Threat different from a standard cybersecurity threat?
How can a business protect itself from Insider Threats?
Non-technical controls: Institute and adhere to a defined set of Policies and Procedures including limiting access according to job scope / position and having clear change management processes Cultivate a culture of trust and appreciation Effectively communicate expectations and security requirements Educate staff about cybersecurity and train them to defend the organization Address cybersecurity in Service Level Agreements (SLAs) Technical Controls: Data Encryption Network Segmentation Predictive Artificial Intelligence Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) User and Entity Behavior Analytics (UEBA) Identity and Access Management Data Loss Protection (DLP) User Activity Monitoring Insider Threat risk is on the rise, but can be mitigated through a planned set of technical and non-technical strategies.
Having specialists help to identify the specific solutions that fit your business, industry and employees can save time, money and stress, while helping to keep the business compliant and sustainable.
Her career spans 20 years with a focus on technology and processes in the healthcare, financial and energy sectors.
She is a sought after speaker and holds leadership roles in several technology industry associations.
Ms. Bonneau has been featured in the Orlando Sentinel, the Orlando Business Journal and other prominent publications.
Areas of expertise Risk management, Cyber Risk Management, compliance, cyber security, systems and technology, product development, anti-money laundering (AML) risk and control, business continuity, training and education Security Articles Regine Bonneau access to an organization’s access to an organization’s network authorized access to an organization’s availability of the organization’s availability of the organization’s information confidentiality integrity or availability cyber risk management had authorized access has or had authorized access information or information information or information systems insider threat insider threats integrity or availability network system or data organization’s information or information organization’s information or information systems organization’s network system organization’s network system or data risk management